#GoodPeople: Brian Oh

#GoodPeople
Our customers are extraordinary people. Here are their stories.

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The last time food and travel photographer Brian Oh smiled so big it hurt, he was in Kathmandu for work in April with a colleague. One afternoon, they headed up the steps to the Buddhist Swayambhunath temple that’s colloquially referred to as “Monkey Temple,” because of the swarms of monkeys that inhabit the grounds and surrounding hills. Just outside the main stupa they sat in the shade to escape the midday sun and have a Coke. “I noticed one particular monkey staring daggers into the back of my colleague’s head from a couple of yards back. I told her not to move, and I began taking pictures as the monkey creeped forward until it stopped inches from her face. Being the good sport that she was, she stayed in place so I could keeping snapping away. Of course, the story ends with monkey fistfuls of hair, screams, and me dying from laughter,” recapped Brian.

Brian Oh

After hearing that, we had to know more about Brian’s friendships. One of his favorite early memories with his best friend comes from a time when they were actually not friends at all. Rather, they more or less hated each other when they met in elementary school, he shared. “I remember making a comment about how loud and obnoxious his gum chewing was and he told me to mind my own business. That was nearly twenty years ago and he’s now my oldest friend,” recalled Brian.

When it comes to his newest friend, they were brought together by work. “She was thrust upon me for an assignment at work. Turns out she’s not a terrible person,” he joked. And, if Brian could tell the person he feels closest to right now something that he hasn’t, he would let them know they’re a terrible singer in the car, but it’s endearing nonetheless.

Speaking of music, when he dances like no one is watching, Brian plays Lotus Flower from Radiohead’s King of Limbs, which he lovingly describes as, “halfway between the Macarena and a seizure.”

It’s a juxtaposition of experiences that constantly refreshes my sense of perspective of how fortunate I am, and that I should never take it for granted.

Moving onto the clothing he surrounds himself with, while Brian’s most prized clothing item is not a particularly exciting item (according to him), it’s certainly been an exciting number of places. It’s his heather gray hoodie from Saturdays NYC that’s about six years old, which provides comfort and durability in spades. It’s a staple in his wardrobe and part of his travel uniform, which means it’s been with him to upwards of 20 countries and dozens of 12 plus hour flights.

All that traveling for his job to developing countries has made Brian think differently recently. “It’s an ongoing exercise in cognitive dissonance. I regularly have weeks where I’ll start off Monday in some of the poorest communities in the world and by the weekend be in some of the wealthiest (like Tokyo, London, or back to DC). It’s a juxtaposition of experiences that constantly refreshes my sense of perspective of how fortunate I am, and that I should never take it for granted,” said Brian.

Brian Oh

When it comes to his perspective of himself in the world, if Brian had to pick a spirit animal, he might say an albatross, because the mythology of the bird is so layered and multifaceted; it’s seen as both a good and bad omen, and among one the most efficient fliers of all birds, covering great distance with almost no effort (some say that they can sleep in flight). Brian continued, “Not that I feel like my presence is particularly portentous, but that perhaps I, like anyone else, can be perceived differently by different people and, like the albatross, keep flying without concern.”

I don’t think that feeling will ever go away, no matter what I actually accomplish in my life, but I think that’s important as it keeps me from being complacent.

If Brian were to get a blue ribbon this week, he’d get it for killing six giant cockroaches in one night in his hotel room in Timor-Leste, where he’s currently staying. “They didn’t stand a chance,” he exclaimed.

Brian is most afraid of not getting the chance to feel like he’s done some measurable good in the world. “I don’t think that feeling will ever go away, no matter what I actually accomplish in my life, but I think that’s important as it keeps me from being complacent,” he elaborated.

If Brian could give a gift to anyone, he’d give President Obama a shirt with Leslie Knope’s face on it and the words “FLAME DUCK.” Which we’d argue, could definitely be measurable good. Get to know more about Brian, and keep in touch with him on Instagram.

Ready for more goodness? Explore our other #goodpeople profiles.

| Posted in #goodpeople |

Hello 9: Cut Straight To What Matters

Phone Illustration Remember telephones without caller ID? This series is meant to prompt a bit of curiosity, discovery and excitement. Like our old friend, the landline. A new shirt in focus every Monday to start your week off on the right foot.

The Florville

Meet our Florville, part of the Barbershop collection celebrating both the man in the spotlight, and the countless others working behind the scenes who helped him become the man he is today.

What’s unique about this shirt?

This shirt was inspired by a Haitian born businessman, William de Fleurville, who worked as the man under the stove top hat. After first meeting Abraham Lincoln in New Salem, Fleurville moved to Springfield, Illinois. There he opened his barber shop across from the State House: a place that would become for Lincoln a near second home.

Why should I care?

The President’s barber for 24 years, Fleurville’s relationship with Lincoln ran much deeper than hair. Lincoln handled Fleurville’s legal affairs and when the President left for Washington, he entrusted the barber with care of his property and affairs. Embodying the bold commitment of its namesake, our Florville features a handsome red, white, and blue pattern with our signature cutaway collar in 120 thread count poplin.

How should I wear it?

This shirt will look great paired with navy or black slacks, dark denim, and even khakis. You might enjoy completing your outfit with a tan belt, and a pair of custom made Sabahs. For a more buttoned up look, wear the Florville with our Seneca blazer in charcoal. Or for a summer evening put on this shirt with a navy cardigan and tan shorts.

When should I wear it?

Well, July 4th and Memorial Day are likely the obvious occasions for showing off your American pride – and for that, the Florville is a perfect fit. But, this shirt is so much more versatile than that. Every day is a good day to wear bold colors, and a unique, sophisticated pattern. For example, if you want to make a good impression in the office, if you’re catching up with an old friend at your local bar, and if you’re headed to a birthday party for your favorite aunt.

Discover our Florville, and cut to what matters most. Or get started by finding your custom fit.

Explore other posts in our Hello? series here.

| Posted in Hello? |

The History Of Menswear Told Through NYPL’S Digital Collection: Part 6

Earlier this year the New York Public Library shared 180,000 prints, maps, manuscripts, and much more in a digital public domain collection for the very first time. In it, we unearthed menswear ads from over one hundred years ago. In this series, we explore them. Discover part six below, and find part one here, part two here, part three here, part four here, and part five here in case you missed them.

Arrow collars & shirts. Saturday evening post, April 13, 1912.

 

Men's white dress shirt

 

This print ad from over 100 years ago shows that white shirts, such as our Kent and Bellevue, have always been a wardrobe staple for gentlemen. Beginning during the Victorian era, the white dress shirt emerged as a symbol of wealth and class distinction, becoming a powerful influence. The pure white color of the cloth meant that only a person of substantial prosperity could afford to wash their shirts frequently enough and own enough, to wear each day. Furthermore, the collar itself become a status symbol, with high-standing detachable collars which prevented a downward gaze. As a result, starched high rigid collars distinguished the elite from those who needed low collars for ease of movement, such as clerks.

As late as the 1920s the white dress shirt was still associated with moral respectability. For example, “in 1924 Thomas J. Watson, the founding father of IBM, insisted on employees wearing a classic white shirt in the office,” according to The Washington Post. You’ll recognize that this association with ideals of determination and loyalty also play out in the ad above.

As Arrow Collars’ highlights, whether playing tennis or going for a drive on a Saturday evening, you can’t go wrong with a white shirt and the air of distinction it provides. By using adjectives such as “attractive and valuable,” and pairing a man with a mate, they’re really tapped into the underlying benefits of looking sharp. The only thing we’re left wondering is why is the gentleman on the side of the road holding a tennis racket and no duffel bag.

What surprised you most about this ad?

| Posted in News |

#GoodPeople: Bryan Mahoney

#GoodPeople
Our customers are extraordinary people. Here are their stories.

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If Co-founder of Dynamo and SVP of Engineering at Glossier, Bryan Mahoney, could give a gift to anyone, as strange as it sounds, he’d give four legs that really work to his dog, Deigan. Deigan has lived almost his entire life with legs that have been broken and put back together more times than Bryan can count. “I want the last few years of his life to be filled with the kind of pain-free running and jumping that he deserves,” said Bryan.

GoodPeople Bryan Mahoney

Exploring Paris in an H&C blazer.

When we asked Bryan what he’s most afraid of not getting the chance to do, he shared he can’t honestly say. “I am always thinking of the next five things I have to or want to do,” he elaborated. So it only made sense that if he had to pick a spirit animal, Bryan would be a horse. “Sort of high maintenance, likes to carry the load, hard-working, steady, and competitive,” he explained.

“I am always thinking of the next five things I have to or want to do.”

Up next, we were interested to learn more about Bryan’s favorite clothing. It turns out, though he hesitates to call it his most “prized” item, Bryan finds himself wearing his Glossier sweater a lot. “It was one thing to wear it in Montreal, no one really knew the brand there. But wearing it in NYC is another story all together,” he exclaimed.

Bryan Mahoney

The last time Bryan smiled so big it hurt was the other day, the day before that, and the day before that, too. “I like to smile,” he said, smiling. Speaking of things that make Bryan happy, we moved on to chat about music. While he wouldn’t call it dancing, when Bryan dances when no one is watching, there’s a good chance the soundtrack he’s listening to has a disproportionate amount of Pearl Jam.

“The entire experience (mostly because of her) has been so much better than I ever could have imagined.”

While it hasn’t impacted his taste in music, becoming a father has made Bryan think about things differently recently. Perhaps that’s why if he could tell the person he feels closest to right now, that he hasn’t yet, he’d let her know, “We’re raising the most incredible daughter, and the entire experience (mostly because of her) has been so much better than I ever could have imagined.” It also explains why the pre-2’s program at New York Kids brought him and one of his newest friends together.

We’re so glad to call Bryan a friend, too. Get to know more about Bryan, and keep in touch with him on Twitter.

Ready for more goodness? Explore our other #goodpeople profiles.

| Posted in #goodpeople |
Hugh & Crye's Seneca in ValetMag

Thanks ValetMag, For Featuring Our Seneca!

“Whether it’s for work or for play, a lightweight blazer is a summertime style staple,” says ValetMag in 4 Ways to Style Your Summer Blazer. We’re so thrilled to see our Seneca blazer in tan highlighted in the article, as a wardrobe workhorse that allows you to feel cool and comfortable while looking put together. ValetMag continues, “There’s an inherent ease to the jacket, which makes for some nice casual pairings that have a sharp, continental swagger—from relaxed chambray shirts to streamlined polos or a featherweight henley.” Check out their recommendations here.

| Posted in Press |
Trackmaven

Pranav’s Fireside Chat (Sans Fire) At TrackMaven

On Friday, Pranav sat down with Allen Gannett and the awesome team at TrackMaven, to share a little bit about Hugh & Crye. We thought you might enjoy one of the stories he told, so here’s a quick peek behind the scenes:

Our 3D collar stays printed on demand are made possible by a Makerbot that Pranav and Philip stuffed into the back seat of a Mini, and drove down from New York. After weeks of tinkering away to get it up and running, we’ve had so much fun watching our customers get creative with them for lots of different purposes. For example, around the holidays, we’ll see many partners ordering for their husbands crafting little love notes on the stays. We’ve also had men place orders for stays including their phone number as the message, perfect for passing out to women during a night out at the club. Our latest favorite order was for “FC Liverpool,” which we’re still trying to prove was our own Ryan Morris from Customer Experience.

Awesome @TrackMaven talk today from local favorite @HughandCrye!” wrote Anna Celentino, and we couldn’t agree more. Thanks for having us!

Learn about our upcoming events by subscribing to our email list below.

| Posted in News |

Hello 8: Support From Lavender And White Stripes

Phone Illustration Remember telephones without caller ID? This series is meant to prompt a bit of curiosity, discovery and excitement. Like our old friend, the landline. A new shirt in focus every Monday to start your week off on the right foot.

The Alibi

Meet our Alibi, a luxurious shirt inspired by gentlemen in Washington DC invested in fostering mutual improvement, education, and enlightenment.

What’s unique about this shirt?

Steeped in the ambitious history of senators and diplomats, the Alibi features our tall point collar, mother-of-pearl buttons, and a luxurious 120s poplin fabric for a silky-smooth feel. It’s lavender and white stripes pattern supplies the unexpected variety every modern gentleman’s closet needs.

Why should I care?

A few reasons, really: These gentle colors bring out the best in nearly any complexion. And, our classic tall-point collar is probably our most traditional collar, and often thought of as a more American collar, which brings an instant touch of sophistication to any outfit. It has a narrower distance between the two collar points and when buttoned, a smaller enclosure for a tie knot. As a result, it’s great buttoned up with a tie, making this a wonderful, silky-smooth shirt for summer weddings, the work week, and beyond.

How should I wear it?

While you’re probably used to whites and blues, purples may seem intimidating – but they shouldn’t be! Nearly everything can easily match with lavender, from black to green and surprisingly, orange. Pair this shirt with khakis for a more casual look, or charcoal slacks to keep it more formal. You could also mix and match with some brown layers, such as a dark chocolate vest and a khaki blazer.

When should I wear it?

Showcasing a smart lavender and white stripes pattern, our Alibi will help you look your best no matter the occasion: whether you’re presenting for a captivated audience or celebrating success with after-work drinks.

Discover our Alibi and the true you. Or get started by finding your custom fit.

Explore other posts in our Hello? series here.

| Posted in Hello? |

The History Of Menswear Told Through NYPL’S Digital Collection: Part 5

Earlier this year the New York Public Library shared 180,000 prints, maps, manuscripts, and much more in a digital public domain collection for the very first time. In it, we unearthed menswear ads from over one hundred years ago. In this series, we explore them. Discover part five below, and find part one here, part two here, part three here, and part four here in case you missed them.

Selections from Macy’s Men’s Furnishing Department 1909.

Men's dress shirts

This print ad for men by Macy’s is nearly one hundred years old, but it feels quite similar to menswear ads today because it hits many themes that are still relevant to men’s fashion. Though, can you imagine selecting your shirt while only being able to see it in black and white?

Macy’s begins the ad with a peer pressure play: If they’re supplying thousands of fashionably dressed men, especially those in New York, you’re probably wondering what you’re missing out on. Then, in a new, but old, twist on free returns Macy’s ensures there’s truly not risk in trying a shirt by promising to “refund your money at once if you are not satisfied.” They’re also offering a special free shipping offer, which you can learn more about on their table of freight rates – which sounds a little intimidating if you ask us. Furthermore, can you imagine writing them via good old-fashioned mail to inquire about any good not depicted on the page, from their selection of “$5,000,000 worth of goods”? That would be quite a shock to those of us who have grown up in the convenience economy. What’s interesting is that they don’t include their address or a phone number on this particular page, so they’ve potentially made it a bit of a challenge to hunt down the goods you want.

Moving onto the products in the ad, Macy’s selection of white shirts feature banded collars, similar to our popovers, though the men shown have topped theirs off with club collars, such as the one on our Foxhall. Beyond that, Macy’s promises a perfect fit and a quality of workmanship equal to custom, with every shirt washed, shrunk, and hand ironed. So, a great fit, one that feels like it was made for you, has always been important. That’s why we designed our 12 new-to-world sizes, that make it quick and easy to find a shirt that feels just right.

While their shirts are made from linen, nearly all of our dress and casual shirts are 100% pure Egyptian cotton, but for a few cut from linen or linen-cotton blends. We source our cottons from all over the world, but predominantly Italy, India and Thailand. And, our fabric costs are the most expensive component of the overall cost of our dress shirts. In short, while many of the same themes are prevalent in menswear ads today, the final product itself has definitely improved.

What else do you find intriguing about this Macy’s ad?

| Posted in News |

The Latrobe: Win Denim That Dares To Be Different

Meet a denim shirt that’s the least pretentious button-down you can own. It’s unassuming yet stylish with an underlying strength and wayward edge, and it could be yours! Just ensure you’re signed up for our email list to be entered to win. We’ll randomly select a winner by midnight ET on Monday, June 20, 2016 to celebrate the start of summer, and get in touch by email!

What’s to love about the Latrobe:

The Latrobe, named after the historic Latrobe Gate at the entrance of Navy Yard, features a washed button-down collar. You’ll find it’s buttery-soft and lightweight with a tailored fit that’s rare for a more utilitarian fabric. No stiffness or cliché adornments—just a rich indigo denim with workwear roots and discreet style. It features a single breast pocket, two back darts, and a light wash for an extra cozy finish. That means you can easily dress it up with a knit tie, layer it with a Henley, or wear it open over a Fitted Tee.

Why is everyone talking about our denim:

“Relaxed yet cool and sharp, Hugh & Crye’s version of the menswear staple is reminiscent of the military uniforms of yesteryear. With their careful execution and attention to details, they have created a classic that can be dressed up with a tie and slacks, or dressed down with khakis and desert boots,” writes Thomas Osam of KarmaLifee

So, subscribe to our email list below, and you’ll be entered for a chance to win our Latrobe. As a bonus you’ll be first to hear about new releases of our limited run collections, upcoming #GoodPeople events, what’s happening around DC, essential reads for lazy Saturday mornings, and more.

| Posted in News |

#GoodPeople: DJ Saul

#GoodPeople
Our customers are extraordinary people. Here are their stories.

::

If CMO and Managing Director of ISL (iStrategyLabs) and aspiring semi-professional bocce player – next stop, Summer Olympics 2028 – DJ (it stands for Darien Jay) Saul could give a gift to anyone, he would buy a new cadillac for his Grandmother “Bubbe” just for being the boss that she is: a Cadillac specifically because…she already has one. That’s a pretty cool gift, from someone who has a pretty cool life philosophy: “Happiness is knowing how to manage your own expectations.”

DJ of ISL

When it comes to one of the things DJ is most afraid of not getting the chance to do, he shared that he really wants to participate in one of the bigger adventure races, such as the Mongol Rally, billed as “the greatest motoring adventure on the planet,” which starts in London and ends in Ulaanbaatar. And, he’s already taking a step in the right direction, because if he were to get a blue ribbon this week it would be for packing lightly for traveling.

Happiness is knowing how to manage your own expectations.

DJ’s most prized clothing item is a vintage Oregon Nike Track jacket. He grew up in Eugene, Oregon where Nike was invented, so it reminds him of his childhood. Exploring his youth further, it turns out DJ’s always been an enterprising young lad. One of his favorite early memories with his best friend was going to local sporting events, and offering concession-running services. “For an expected tip we’d go grab food and drinks for fans, and bring it to their seats. It worked great,” he exclaimed. Perhaps he was inspired by his heroes: his parents circa 1977. “They ran a whitewater rafting outfitters and kayak school while living in a treehouse,” he shared.

DJ of ISL

That might help explain why DJ most seems himself as an otter, if he had to pick a spirit animal; one in the water outdoors that works hard and plays hard, and most importantly, likes to hold hands. DJ also enjoys mentoring and advising those who seek and need help, and advice as much as possible – exercising one of his favorite quotes by Richard Bach: “You teach best what you most need to learn.”

You teach best what you most need to learn.

DJ and one of his newest friends were brought together by being the only two people on a larger group trip who liked hip hop music. Though when DJ dances when no one is watching, he plays Ace of Base’s All That She Wants. Beyond that, without fail he tunes into NPR daily.

On Sundays he watches soccer, catches up on some reading, gets some work done, and then cooks entirely too much food. Which explains his secret pleasure: “Watching Triple D (Diners, Drive-ins and Dives on Food Network), quite possibly the best worst show on TV,” he says. Speaking of food, the most delicious thing he put in his fridge recently was Girl Scout samoa cookies. Something he detests? Raisins in cookies. Which is OK by us; we’re team chocolate chip all the way too!

Get to know more about DJ, and keep in touch with him on Instagram.

Ready for more goodness? Explore our other #goodpeople profiles.

| Posted in #goodpeople |