Parterre Pocket Cocktail

Parterre & The English Garden

The Pocket Cocktail

In this series, we pair one of our one-of-a-kind print pocket squares with a delicious cocktail. One starts a conversation, the other keeps it going. Today’s edition is an elegant summer cocktail, and was crafted by Lucy of Supergolden Bakes.

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The English Garden

[inspired by our Parterre pocket square]

Cool off with a simple, refreshing cucumber based cocktail.

  • 1/4 cucumber, cubed
  • 1/4 cup gin
  • 1/8 cup simple syrup
  • 1/8 cup pasteurized egg white
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • 1-2 tablespoons elderflower cordial
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves
  • 6 strips of cucumber to decorate

Put the cucumber, lemon juice, thyme, and cordial in your shaker, and muddle with a muddler. Try to get the juice out of the cucumber. Add the gin, simple syrup, and egg white, and half fill the shaker with fresh ice. Shake vigorously until a frost forms on the shaker then strain into two chilled martini glasses (or use small elegant flutes). Decorate with strips of cucumber and a sprig of thyme.

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Who might you enjoy this cocktail with?

Photos and recipe courtesy of Supergolden Bakes.

| Posted in Pocket Cocktail |
Mint Julep and Kelvin Pocket Square

Kelvin & Louisville Julep

The Pocket Cocktail

In this series, we pair one of our one-of-a-kind print pocket squares with a delicious cocktail. One starts a conversation, the other keeps it going. Today’s edition is a simple mint julep perfect for relaxing lakeside this weekend, and was crafted by David Wondrich of Port Cocktail.

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The Louisville Julep

[inspired by our Kelvin pocket square]

A popular formula for a refreshing mint julep.

  • 1 1/2 teaspoons superfine sugar
  • 1/2 oz water
  • 1 oz. Taylor-Fladgate 10 Year Old Tawny Port
  • 1 oz. Larressingle VSOP Armagnac
  • 1 oz. Appleton Estate Reserve Rum
  • 6 or 7 mint leaves

Put 1 1/2 teaspoons superfine sugar and 1/2 oz water in the bottom of a pint glass and stir to dissolve. Add 6 or 7 mint leaves and press them lightly with a muddler. Fill the glass with finely-cracked ice. Then add the rest of the ingredients. Pour this carefully into another pint glass, pour it back, and repeat 3 times until everything is mixed. Add more ice to fill the glass, insert 4 good sprigs of mint, nestle a berry or two among the mint, and add a couple of straws.

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Who might you enjoy this cocktail with?

Photos and recipe courtesy of Port Cocktail.

| Posted in Pocket Cocktail |

The History Of Menswear Told Through NYPL’S Digital Collection: Part 12

Earlier this year the New York Public Library shared 180,000 prints, maps, manuscripts, and much more in a digital public domain collection for the very first time. In it, we unearthed menswear ads from over one hundred years ago. In this series, we explore them. Discover part twelve below, and find the other parts here in case you missed them.

Arrow collars and Cluett shirts 1895

Unique Styles of Men's Dress Shirts
This ad from Arrow & Cluett from over 100 years ago shows how clothes have always been an outlet for self-expression. Here they’re appealing to men’s desires to look good and set themselves apart from the crowd with ease. They explain that their products are favored by men who are both on-trend and who create stylish looks that reflect their own sophisticated taste – making them unique.

Here at Hugh & Crye, we believe in supporting your “distinguished individuality” too, with a range of versatile styles and designs. We feel that nothing you wear should be louder than your own personality.  So, we choose styles that are both timeless and modern, for example explore our take on denim. We think trends are for suckers, and you’ll never find one of our shirts to have a goofy logo or unnecessary flair.

So, while you won’t look like every other guy on the street when you wear one of our shirts, we mean that in a good way. And, you’ll be able to enjoy wearing our shirts for years to come.

What do you think the guy in the back of this ad is thinking?

 

| Posted in News |
NPK Pocket Cocktail

NPK & The Nomad

The Pocket Cocktail

In this series, we pair one of our one-of-a-kind print pocket squares with a delicious cocktail. One starts a conversation, the other keeps it going. Today’s edition is a gin-based cocktail that takes advantage of seasonal citrus, and was crafted by Kaiser Penguin.

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The Nomad

[inspired by our NPK pocket square]

This cocktail is complex, refreshing, and leaves you digging for clues.

  • 2oz Anchor junipero gin
  • 1/2oz Bols genever gin
  • 1/2oz Hayman’s old tom gin
  • 1/4oz Krogstad aquavit
  • 1oz lime
  • 1/2oz white grapefruit
  • 2t lemon
  • 1/2oz cinnamon syrup
  • 1/4oz falernum
  • 1/4oz demerara syrup
  • 1/4oz orgeat
  • grapefruit peel for garnish

Build in a glass with large ice cubes, stir, and garnish with a piece of grapefruit peel.

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Who might you enjoy this cocktail with?

Recipe and photo courtesy of Kaiser Penguin.

| Posted in Pocket Cocktail |

The History Of Menswear Told Through NYPL’S Digital Collection: Part 11

Earlier this year the New York Public Library shared 180,000 prints, maps, manuscripts, and much more in a digital public domain collection for the very first time. In it, we unearthed menswear ads from over one hundred years ago. In this series, we explore them. Discover part nine below, and find the other parts here in case you missed them.

Arrow Donchester Dress Shirts 1915

The Proper Fitting Men's Dress Shirt

This Arrow dress shirt ad for the Donchester shirt from 1915 shows how important a good fit has always been to achieving the best look. This is the second Donchester ad we’ve taken a look at. In this ad, similarly to the other, they bring home the importance of a better fit by highlighting that the bosom of a Donchester Shirt – like good manners – is never out of place. However, the illustration style is a bit more whimsical in this ad, and only features black and white which is less attention calling.

They go on to describe a common problem of ill-fitting dress shirts: muffin top, and purport that their shirt solves for it. When a men’s dress shirt isn’t tailored properly through the torso and is then tucked in, all that extra fabric puffs out around the waist creating what most closely resembles the top of a muffin. This is the most prevalent—and in our opinion, the least pardonable—fit problem.

That’s why Arrow claims that their shirt doesn’t buckle up and bulge out of the waist-coat opening. Nearly 100 years later, our signature tapered fit solves the same problem and many more; it’s a great way to find a shirt that feels like it was custom made for you, right off the rack.

Which ill-fitting problem do you most often encounter?

| Posted in News |
Copenhagen Pocket Square

Roof Garden & Copenhagen

The Pocket Cocktail

In this series, we pair one of our one-of-a-kind print pocket squares with a delicious cocktail. One starts a conversation, the other keeps it going. Today’s edition is made with two herbs that thrive in urban rooftop gardens, and was crafted by Tina Rupp of Food & Wine.

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The Roof Garden

[inspired by our Copenhagen pocket square]

This refreshing vodka cocktail is made with thyme and mint.

  • 15 mint leaves, plus 1 mint sprig for garnish
  • 2 thyme sprigs
  • 1 ounce Simple Syrup
  • 2 ounces vodka
  • 1 ounce fresh lemon juice
  • Ice
  • 1 to 2 ounces chilled club soda

In a cocktail shaker, muddle the mint leaves with the thyme and Simple Syrup. Add the vodka, lemon juice and ice and shake well. Strain into a highball glass over ice, top with the club soda and garnish with the mint sprig.

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Who might you enjoy this cocktail with?

Recipe and photo courtesy of Food & Wine.

| Posted in Pocket Cocktail |

The History Of Menswear Told Through NYPL’S Digital Collection: Part 10

Earlier this year the New York Public Library shared 180,000 prints, maps, manuscripts, and much more in a digital public domain collection for the very first time. In it, we unearthed menswear ads from over one hundred years ago. In this series, we explore them. Discover part ten below, and find the other parts here in case you missed them.

For the well dressed man 1922

For The Well Dressed Man

In 1922, comfort was the keynote of the modern man’s wardrobe. Tightly fitted clothes gave way to those that were more loosely cut, but still shaped, like our signature tapered fit.

The article above, from NYPL’s digital collection, shares what was viewed as stylish menswear at the time during the summer, making recommendations for everything from jackets down to footwear. Comfortable clothes were seen as incredibly necessary during the American summer, as it “felt almost tropical.” However, this article cautions men not to confuse comfort with carelessness.

Double-breasted jackets were recommended, but it was deemed alright to skip the waist-coat. In addition the wing collar, with its very wide opening, was seen as undoubtedly the most correct for evening wear. Also pumps were recommended, not because were better form for evening wear than dancing shoes, but because they gave great ease in midsummer.

Today, we recommend a similar look for summer comfort that will still ensure you feel your best. Try pairing any of our unlined Seneca blazers with a Classic shirt, dark denim, and Sabahs (no pumps necessary). But what is most important about being comfortable, is that whatever you’re wearing feels true to you!

What’s a summer outfit you back to again and again?

| Posted in News |
Stylish Pocket Square

Dripline & Kumquat Basil Caipirinha

The Pocket Cocktail

In this series, we pair one of our one-of-a-kind print pocket squares with a delicious cocktail. One starts a conversation, the other keeps it going. Today’s edition is an incredibly simple and delicious cocktail created by Prairie Rose of Bit By a Fox.

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The Kumquat Basil Caipirinha

[inspired by our Dripline pocket square]

This springtime, garden party take on the caipirinha is perfect for evening sipping or brunch.

  • 2 oz Cachaça (Leblon is a solid choice)
  • 1/2 lime (cut into wedges)
  • 1 tsp raw sugar
  • 2-3 basil leaves
  • 1 kumquat (1/2 for garnish)

In a mixing glass or tin, muddle the lime, sugar, basil and 1/2 kumquat. Add ice, pour in cachaça and stir. Transfer to a chilled old-fashioned glass and garnish with 1/2 kumquat.

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Who might you enjoy this cocktail with?

Recipe and photo courtesy of Bit By a Fox.

| Posted in Pocket Cocktail |

The History Of Menswear Told Through NYPL’S Digital Collection: Part 9

Earlier this year the New York Public Library shared 180,000 prints, maps, manuscripts, and much more in a digital public domain collection for the very first time. In it, we unearthed menswear ads from over one hundred years ago. In this series, we explore them. Discover part nine below, and find the other parts here in case you missed them.

More Novelty In The Shirt Way 1865

Patterned Shirts Cartoon
This cartoon by John Leech from 1865 pokes a bit of fun at dress shirt patterns, and how they’re determined to be in vogue based on their fabrics and patterns. Just because something is new, and potentially even on-trend, doesn’t mean it’s the shirt that’s going to make you look and feel your best. That’s why we believe in creating shirt patterns that don’t look like every other, but still embody a sense of timeless style.

When it comes to fabric, men’s dress shirts originated as mostly cottons or linen during the summer. In 1910, silk was very popular until the cost of silk import drove the prices too high around 1920. In the early years, thicker, coarser weaves such as broadcloth were favored, with the softer oxfords and mercerized cotton leading the later years.

Today, nearly all of our dress and casual shirts are 100% pure Egyptian cotton, but for a few cut from linen or linen-cotton blends. We source our cottons from all over the world, but predominantly Italy, India and Thailand.

Then, from the 1930s on, fabric and design options exploded. Flannel, cotton, rayon, and tons of prints and styles were introduced and the modern variety of options was born. Different cuts and styles have come and gone since, ranging from Classics to our original popover.

How do you pick which patterns to give a try?

| Posted in News |
Edens Men's Dress Shirt for Lean And Athletic Men

Hello 11: Break Beyond Boundaries In Blue Check

Phone Illustration Remember telephones without caller ID? This series is meant to prompt a bit of curiosity, discovery and excitement. Like our old friend, the landline. A new shirt in focus every Monday to start your week off on the right foot.

The Edens

At long last, discover a cheerful new twist on the workweek blues. Our Edens dress shirt is part of our Professionals collection inspired by impactful expressways in Chicago; those that have reshaped the region perhaps more than any other twentieth-century force.

What’s unique about this shirt?

Influenced by the three-lane William G. Edens Expressway — the first of its kind in Chicago in 1951, our Edens shirt features a unique blue and white check pattern. Showcasing our button-down collar (not too big, not too small), and a smooth, durable 100s poplin fabric, the Edens makes a smart impression.

Why should I care?

Blue is one of the most popular dress shirt colors, as it appeals to both men and women. And, this shirt features classic blue and white, while making a fun statement. Checked shirts can often be associated with more casual outfits, but this pattern actually brings an interesting dimension to a formal look. Furthermore, this print is not too busy, ensuring the finished outfit is clean and polished.

How should I wear it?

Wear it with dark denim for walks around town or with black slacks to evening dinners under the stars. If you want to pair it with a tie, which is totally a choice of preference when it comes to a button-down collar, a typical rule is to make your checked shirts lighter than your tie. And, to go with a larger pattern on your tie to create a nice contrast. It will also look nice with a charcoal cardigan.

When should I wear it?

The Edens is a more casual shirt, perfect no matter where you want to travel, and it’s fully weekend ready. Take it along for hitting the open road and heading to the mountains. Or stay at home, and catch up with your neighborhoods around a backyard fire pit.

Explore the Edens, and pave the way in blue and white check. Or get started by finding your custom fit.

Explore other posts in our Hello? series here.

| Posted in Hello? |